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Press: 2014 News Releases

12/19/2014

California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways Announces Deadline for Grants for Beach Erosion and Beach Replenishments Programs




12/05/2014

Water Hyacinth Mechanical Harvesting Begins in the Delta

Water Hyacinth Mechanical Harvesting Begins in the Delta


Contact:
Vicky Waters
Vicky.Waters@parks.ca.gov
(916) 653-5115

December 5, 2014


SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) will begin mechanical harvesting of Water Hyacinth in parts of the Delta this morning. A contract was finalized this week with Clean Lakes, Inc. of Martinez, and harvesting will take place in areas most impacted by the hyacinth.

The focus of the mechanical harvesting will begin with a section of the Stockton Deep Water Channel from Weber Point to Buckley Cove.  Other adjacent areas where water hyacinth has travelled and is impairing navigation will also be harvested.  Water hyacinth is an aquatic weed that is reactive to changing weather conditions.  While it thrives in warm and dry weather, it can move and travel within waterways in rainy and windy conditions, and die off in hard freezes.  Rain and wind can impact treatment, so harvesting will be conducted in infested areas if weather conditions are favorable.

DBW recognizes the challenges with water hyacinth, and its impact to the public. New treatment methods and chemicals are continually being considered. Mechanical harvesting is an alternative treatment for DBW that is in compliance with federal environmental regulations to deal with this invasive aquatic plant.

The Division of Boating and Waterways conducted its annual herbicide treatment season for Water Hyacinth in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) since March 2014 through the end of November. As of November 26, 2014, the Water Hyacinth Control Program completed 561 herbicide treatments in 149 sites that cover the Delta, San Joaquin River and Tuolumne River. Approximately 2,500 acres of water hyacinth were treated with glyphosate and 2, 4-D. Continuous monitoring is conducted to ensure navigability of waterways.

DBW works with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to obtain approval for conducting the WHCP from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). A third approval is also obtained from the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board.   The approval process is in place to determine if the use of these herbicides may affect any threatened, endangered or sensitive species, and critical habitats.

In 1982, California state legislation designated DBW as the lead state agency to cooperate with other state, local and federal agencies in controlling water hyacinth in the Delta, its tributaries and the Suisun Marsh. There is no known eradication method for water hyacinth once it has been established. Therefore, DBW conducts a control program as opposed to an eradication program. The program seeks to minimize negative impacts of the invasive plant on navigation, public safety, recreation, agricultural activities and ecosystem services in Delta waterways.

Funding for water hyacinth treatment comes from the Harbors and Watercraft Revolving Fund, which receives revenues from boaters’ registration fees and gasoline taxes.

In addition to mechanical harvesting, DBW crews will provide assistance with other removal methods, such as herding and hand-picking, in an effort to continue providing an essential public service.

DBW encourages the public to report water hyacinth sightings via the following 1-888-326-2822 or email DBW at AIS@parks.ca.gov.  For more information on DBW’s Water Hyacinth Control Program, visit www.dbw.parks.ca.gov



Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.

California State Parks Mission
To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.






08/26/2014

California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways Encourages Boating Safety During Labor Day Weekend

California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways Encourages Boating Safety During Labor Day Weekend


Contact:
Vicky Waters
Vicky.Waters@parks.ca.gov
(916) 653-5115

August 26, 2014


California’s 2013 boating accident statistics show that three out of four boating accident drowning victims were not wearing life jackets. In addition, this year’s drought conditions have impacted many local waterways resulting in potential boating hazards.
“Drought conditions may reduce water levels, but not the dangers,” said DBW’s Acting Deputy Director Col. Christopher C. Conlin, USMC (Ret.). “Life jackets can save lives in the event a boat runs aground, hits a snag or a log. We strongly encourage everyone on a vessel to wear a lifejacket, plan ahead, and take the appropriate precautions while recreating on the water.”

Here are some steps every boater can take to reduce the risk of accidents, prevent serious injuries and ensure a safe and enjoyable weekend:

Wear A Lifejacket
Wear a properly fitted, Coast Guard-approved life jacket. Children under 13 years of age, anyone being towed behind a vessel, or persons operating a personal watercraft are required by law to wear a lifejacket. In addition, every person on a vessel must have a lifejacket available. No matter how low water levels are, all persons are encouraged to wear a life jacket, especially with children and on cold or fast inland waters where lifeguards are not stationed. Even when cooling off in the water, boaters should be alert for rip currents and sneaker waves. For more information on lifejackets, please visit: www.WearItCalifornia.com.

Conserve Water
With record-setting drought conditions in California, it is imperative that we all do our part to conserve water. Boaters are encouraged to repurpose unused water from their trip and skip the boat wash. Unless you need to rinse the salt water, just wipe the boat down with a damp cloth. For more tips on water conservation, visit www.SaveOurWater.com.

Low Water Hazards
Recreational boating has been impacted by drought conditions in the State. When on the water, adjust boating activities to the drought conditions. Areas that were easily boated a year ago may be different and unfamiliar to boaters this year, potentially increasing boating dangers. For instance, many lakes may have decreased boat launch ramps available, or reduced speed limits. We encourage boaters to keep a proper lookout for any obstructions, including trees, snags, and sandbars.

Alcohol
The side effects of alcohol – impaired judgment, reduced balance, poor coordination – can be magnified by the boating environment of sun, wave action and dehydration. Check for local rules; alcohol is banned on some waterways at holiday periods. If you do drink, wear a life jacket.

Plan Ahead
Boaters should plan ahead and find out if their favorite boating spot has any operating restrictions. Operating boats on rivers or the ocean greatly differs from boating on lakes. Boaters should check navigation maps for water and weather conditions, and better yet, invite someone with local experience to show you how to safely boat in unfamiliar areas.

For more safety tips or to view California’s boating laws, please visit www.BoatCalifornia.com.

Reporting a Boating Accident in California
State law requires boaters involved in accidents to file a written report with DBW when a person dies, disappears or requires medical attention beyond first aid. A report is also required when an accident results in damage to a vessel or other property exceeding $500 or there is a complete loss of a vessel. Boating Accident Report Form

About California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW)
DBW promotes on-the-water safety education and helps develop convenient public access to the waterways through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments.

Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.

California State Parks Mission
To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.




08/14/2014

Boating and Waterways Commission to Advise and Comment on $800,000 in Boating Facility Improvement Grants

Boating and Waterways Commission to Advise and Comment on $800,000 in Boating Facility Improvement Grants


Contact:
Greg Imura
(916) 651-5691

August 14, 2014


Items the Commission will advise and comment on include:

Upper Sunrise Boat Launching Facility: Sacramento County
Commission will advise and comment on Sacramento County’s request for a $500,000 Harbors and Watercraft Revolving Fund Grant to pave and stripe the existing boat launching facility parking area, add a gravel base to the overflow parking area and repave the connecting roadway between the parking areas.

Lower Blue Oaks Boat Launching Facility: Tuolumne County
Commission will advise and comment on Don Pedro’s Recreation Agency request for a $300,000 Harbors and Watercraft Revolving Fund Grant to plan, permit and establish an engineer’s estimate of probable construction costs to construct a concrete parking area and add boarding floats to the low-water boat launch ramp and construct a boater restroom at the upper (high-water) boat launch facilities.

Other topics of discussion will include California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterway’s (DBW) public safety, oceanography and boating infrastructure grant programs, and public input on a change in regulations for the Quagga and Zebra Mussel Grant Program.

A detailed agenda of the meeting and information on the commission may be found on the Commission’s website.

The Commission is mandated by the Harbors and Navigation Code to advise and comment on all matters within the jurisdiction of DBW. The Commission must also advise and comment on all boating facilities loans and grants proposed by the division.

DBW provides grants to a county, city, district or other public agency for the construction of small craft boating launching facilities and loans to local agencies for the construction of small craft harbors. Grant and loan applications are submitted to DBW and funding for approved projects is derived from the taxes paid by boaters on the purchase of vessel gasoline and the repayment of principal and interest on department-made loans.

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Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.

California State Parks Mission
To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.






07/30/2014

Application Deadline for Boating Infrastructure Grants for Marina Operators on August 15, 2014

APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR BOATING INFRASTRUCTURE GRANTS FOR MARINA OPERATORS ON AUGUST 15, 2014


Contact:
Vicky Waters
Vicky.Waters@parks.ca.gov
(916) 653-5115

Public Notice

July 30, 2014


Nationally, $12 million in BIG funding is available this year for projects to install or upgrade visitor tie-up facilities for recreational boats 26 feet long or more. Eligible projects include the renovation or construction of visitor docks, restrooms, gangways and dockside utility hook-ups.

Applicants should first review the federal guidelines, available at www.dbw.ca.gov/funding/BIG.aspx, to determine if they meet the necessary requirements.  Those marina operators eligible to compete in this program should follow the BIG Proposal Template available at www.dbw.ca.gov/PDF/BIG/BIGproposal.pdf. Applicants must submit a grant proposal to the California State Parks, Division of Boating and Waterways following the federal guidelines on or before August 15, 2014

The Division of Boating and Waterways enhances public access to the waterways and promotes on-the-water safety through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments.

For more information on the BIG program, or to answer questions on the guidelines or template application, please contact DBW Grant Program Manager Ron Kent at (916) 327-1819.

Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.

California State Parks Mission
To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.



06/04/2014

DBW Begins 2014 Egeria Densa Control Program in Delta

DBW Begins 2014 Egeria Densa Control Program in Delta


Contact:
Vicky Waters
Vicky.Waters@parks.ca.gov
(916) 653-5115

Public Notice

June 04, 2014


Fluridone, in a form of a pellet, will be applied at very low rates. Treated areas will be monitored weekly to ensure herbicide levels do not exceed allowable limits, and that herbicide treatments have no adverse impacts on the environment, agriculture or public health in or near these planned treatment areas:

  • Bethel Island: Franks Tract
  • King Island: Bishop Cut and Honker Cut
  • Anchorages Boat Ramps and Marinas: Buckley Cove (River Point Marina and Ladd’s Marina), Cruiser Haven, Delta Yacht Club, Korth’s Pirate’s Lair, Oxbow Marina, Perry’s Yacht Harbor, BW Marina and Willow Berm Marina.
  • Clifton Court Area of Old River: Italian Slough and Kings Island
  • Sacramento Area : Sacramento Marina

All treatment areas will be treated once a week for 12 continuous weeks. Treatment is subject to change based on governmental requirements, weather conditions, plant growth, waterway traffic and other conditions. A public notice and treatment area maps may be viewed on DBW’s website.

Discovery Bay will not be treated this year, as the infestation levels of Egeria densa have been significantly reduced over the last three years of herbicide treatments by DBW.  Egeria densa is at a manageable controlled level in Discovery Bay and is not a hindrance to navigable waterways.  Given this current level, DBW is focusing herbicide treatment on other identified infestation areas within the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta where navigable waterways are threatened. 

Sites were selected using both physical observation and underwater vegetation mapping techniques samples were also taken to determine the dominant species of underwater vegetation. Site selection was made based on the amount of vegetation found, recreational use of the area, propeller clearances and whether the vegetation was a hazard to navigation.

Egeria densa begins to show symptoms of herbicide treatment approximately three to four weeks after the first treatment. Bleaching of plant tips is one symptom. This bleaching continues down the stem of the plant eventually killing the plant.

The EDCP was established in 2001 to control Egeria densa in the Delta and its major tributaries. The program is managed by DBW with its federal partner, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service.

Egeria densa is a fast growing, non-native submerged aquatic plant having a significant impact on the shallow water habitat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta ecosystem. In the 50 years since the plant was introduced into the Delta, the infestation has grown to approximately 10,000 surface acres or 18 percent of 55,000 surface acres of the Delta. Egeria densa influences the Delta’s biological diversity, recreation and agriculture. This non-native invasive weed crowds out native plants, slows water flows, entraps sediments, obstructs waterways, impedes anadromous fish migration patterns and clogs agricultural and municipal water intakes. It is important to note that this plant has never been eradicated from moving water anywhere in the world.

For more information on the Egeria densa Control Program or to view reports, please visit www.dbw.parks.ca.gov/AquaticInvasiveSpecies.

Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.

California State Parks Mission
To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.

Division of Boating and Waterways Mission
To provide safe and convenient public access to California’s waterways and leadership in promoting safe, enjoyable and environmentally sound recreational boating.

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05/20/2014

Free Oil Spill Response Technique Seminars for Southern California Marinas and Yacht Clubs

RISING TEMPERATURES AND SPRING SNOWMELT PROMPTS WATER SAFETY WARNING


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval, PIO
(916) 651-5692

May 20, 2014


SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Southern California marina and yacht club operators are invited to attend one of two free seminars on proper oil spill response techniques. The seminars will take place June 6 at the San Diego Yacht Club and July 17 at the Port Royal Yacht Club in Redondo Beach. Space is limited and registration is required.

As waterfront stakeholders, marina and yacht club operators possess extensive local waterway and boating knowledge. Seminars will cover information on:

  • California’s oil spill response structure
  • Office of Spill Prevention and Response equipment grants
  • Third party claim process
  • General information on oil spill kits for boating facilities
  • California’s new Marinas and Yacht Clubs Spill Response Communication Packet
  • Tools and resources available to increase communication capabilities between boating facilities and the Office of Emergency Services during an oil spill.

Key presenters will include: California Department of Fish and Wildlife, California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways, California Coastal Commission’s Boating Clean and Green Program, and the Governor's Office of Emergency Services.

To register, please contact California’s Boating Clean and Green Program Coordinator, Vivian Matuk, via e-mail or at (415) 904-6905. Information on the location, lunch and parking options will be provided once registration has been processed. Registration for the San Diego workshop is required by June 2 and July 14 for the Redondo Beach workshop.

Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.

About Boating Clean and Green
The Boating Clean and Green Program is an education and outreach program conducted through the California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways and California Coastal Commission. The program promotes environmentally-sound boating practices to marine business and boaters.


05/16/2014

Rising Temperatures and Spring Snowmelt Prompts Water Safety Warning

RISING TEMPERATURES AND SPRING SNOWMELT PROMPTS WATER SAFETY WARNING
PG&E and State Parks Urge Water Recreationists to use Caution in and near Water


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval, PIO
(916) 651-5692

May 16, 2014


SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Water enthusiasts should take serious precautions against cold temperatures and swift currents when in or near water this spring.

Despite this year’s below-normal snowfall, the spring snowmelt can still result in swift and cold river flows that can create treacherous conditions for all recreationists – waders, swimmers, paddlers, boaters, anglers, and even hikers cooling off at the water’s edge. Lower water levels can also expose hazards or make them closer to the surface.

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), California State Parks and its Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) caution that even though the water content of California’s mountain snowpack is below normal, the snowpack is rapidly melting as mid-spring temperatures continue to rise. As warmer weather and longer days speed up melting snow in mountainous regions, water temperatures will continue to drop and flows can change suddenly in waterways and reservoirs.

“We ask those enjoying the outdoors to be careful near mountain streams, rivers and reservoirs,” said Randy Livingston, PG&E’s Vice President of Power Generation. “Water flows will fluctuate with the warming and cooling of the day so always be prepared for a change in conditions.”

“Never get too comfortable around water when recreating, no matter how low the levels are,” said Major General Anthony L. Jackson, USMC (Ret.), Director of California State Parks. “This year we are asking water enthusiasts to adjust with water-related activities to the drought conditions. Water conditions in some waterways are low enough to make for hazardous boating. It is also critical for everyone in or around the water to wear life jackets at all times, no matter if water levels are low.”

“Spring is a wonderful time to recreate in California’s waterways,” said Colonel Christopher C. Conlin, USMC (Ret), DBW’s Deputy Director. “But please read the safety tips in this water safety warning because making a mistake could threaten the life of a loved one.” 

Water safety tips:

Know the Water

  • Sudden immersion in cold water can stimulate the “gasp reflex,” causing an involuntary inhalation of air or water. It can even trigger cardiac arrest, temporary paralysis, hypothermia and drowning. When faced with swift water, even the strongest swimmers may be easily overwhelmed.
  • Cold water entering the ear canal can cause vertigo and disorientation. This may confuse swimmers, causing them to venture deeper into the water.
  • Recreating in PG&E canals and flumes is strictly prohibited. Stay out of canals and flumes, which are very dangerous due to slippery sides and fast moving water.
  • Lower lakes and rivers can expose hazards like rocks and trees, or make them closer to the surface.

Know your Limits

  • Swimming in open water is more difficult than in a swimming pool – people tire more quickly and can get into trouble.
  • Cold water causes impairment leading to fatalities. It reduces body heat 25 to 30 times faster than air does at the same temperature.
  • Many unseen obstacles can be lurking below the water’s surface. Swift water can make these obstacles even more treacherous. Guided trips for inexperienced paddlers are recommended.

Wear a Life Jacket

  • Conditions change quickly in open water and even the best swimmers can misjudge the water and their skills when boating or swimming. Wearing a life jacket can increase survival time.
  • A life jacket can provide some thermal protection against the onset of hypothermia and keep you afloat until someone else can rescue you.

Parental Supervision

  • Actively supervise children in and around open bodies of water, giving them your undivided attention. Appoint a designated “water watcher,” taking turns with other adults.
  • Teach children that swimming in open water is not the same as swimming in a pool: they need to be aware of uneven surfaces, river currents, ocean undertow and changing weather.

Know the Law

  • Every child under 13 must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket when on a moving vessel that is 26 feet or less in length.
  • A Coast Guard-approved life jacket must be carried for each person on board a boat. This includes rigid or inflatable paddlecraft.
  • Every person on board a personal watercraft (popularly known as “jet skis”) and any person being towed behind a vessel must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • It is against the law to operate a boat or water ski with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more. You can be arrested even when your BAC is less than 0.08 percent if conditions are deemed to be unsafe.

About DBW
DBW enhances public access to California’s waterways and promotes on-the-water safety to California’s more than four million motorized and non-motorized boaters through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments. For more information, visit www.dbw.parks.ca.gov. Click here to view this year’s boating season media kit.

About PG&E
Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE:PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with more than 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to nearly 16 million people in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit www.pge.com/ and http://www.pge.com/about/newsroom/.  For more information on public safety related to our hydro please call PG&E’s Hydro Safety Line (415) 973-SAFE. Or visit our recreation website at www.pge.com/recreation

About California State Parks
California State Parks manages 278 parks units in a system that contains 1.5 million acres, 300 miles of the California coastline, 640 miles of lakefront and more than 300 miles of rivers. More than 65-million people visited State Parks in 2010. For more information, visit www.parks.ca.gov.

NOTE TO MEDIA: Story opportunities on water safety can be scheduled with DBW.



05/13/2014

DBW Holds Life Jacket Trade-In Program Statewide this Saturday

DBW Holds Life Jacket Trade-In Program Statewide this Saturday


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval, PIO
(916) 651-5692

May 13, 2014

Media Kit


What: Life Jacket Trade-In Program provides recreational boaters the opportunity for life jackets to be inspected by professionals. If a life jacket is found to be outgrown or unserviceable, a new, properly fitted Coast Guard-approved life jacket will be given in exchange (one life jacket per family, while supplies last).

Who:  California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways

When: Saturday, May 17 from Noon to 2 p.m.

Where: 46 statewide locations

DBW encourages recreational boaters to take part in this life saving program. Life jackets that are too small will not be able to keep your body afloat. Life jackets that are too big will cause the device to push up around the face, which could be dangerous.

California’s 2013 boating accident statistics show that fatalities can be decreased significantly when wearing a life jacket. Of the 38 boating fatalities in 2013, 68 percent of victims drowned. Of that group, 81 percent were not wearing a life jacket. Properly fitted life jackets save lives. There is no excuse not to wear one. Modern life jackets are much more comfortable, lightweight and stylish than the bulky orange style most boaters are familiar with.

The life jacket trade-in is being conducted in coordination with National Safe Boating Week (May 17-23), which aims to spread the message about life jacket wear and other life-saving boating practices.

Visit www.WearItCalifornia.com to view the list of trade-in locations, tips and laws on life jackets, and to view information on life jacket loaner stations.

NOTE TO MEDIA: Story opportunities on boating and water safety can be scheduled with California State Parks.

Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.

About Parks
To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.

About DBW
DBW is a division within California State Parks. The division provides safe and convenient public access to California’s waterways and leadership in promoting safe, enjoyable and environmentally sound recreational boating.





05/13/2014

California's Recreational Boaters Encouraged to Wear Life Jackets & Save Water

California’s Recreational Boaters Encouraged to Wear Life Jackets & Save Water


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval, PIO
(916) 651-5692

May 13, 2014

Media Kit


SACRAMENTO, Calif. –California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) encourages recreational boaters this year to wear life jackets and save water.

Recreational boating activity and boating accidents increase during the boating season, which runs from Memorial Day through Labor Day. It is critical for boaters to plan ahead, exercise precaution and encourage everyone in a boat to wear a life jacket in order to minimize the risk of being involved in a boating accident or reduce the severity of them.

California’s 2013 boating accident statistics show that fatalities can be decreased significantly when wearing a life jacket. Of the 38 boating fatalities in 2013, 68 percent of victims drowned. Of that group, 81 percent were not wearing a life jacket. Life jackets save lives. There is no excuse not to wear one. Modern life jackets are much more comfortable, lightweight and stylish than the bulky orange style most boaters are familiar with.   

This year, boaters are also being asked to adopt a new habit. Our state is facing one of the most severe droughts in history. Water is a precious commodity in California, and we must all do our part to conserve our water resources. Because of the drought and low water levels, recreational boating may be impacted throughout the season in some bodies of water. Let’s conserve together. Conserving can keep water in our lakes and therefore provide more recreational opportunities.

That’s this year’s theme for DBW’s public safety outreach campaign: “Be a hero. Wear your life jacket and save water”. 

“Boating accident statistics repeatedly show us that life jackets can save lives”, said Sylvia O. Hunter, Deputy Director of DBW. “Therefore, this year’s boating safety media campaign focuses on the fact that we must ensure everyone that is on a boat or recreating near water to wear a life jacket.”

So what should boaters expect this boating season? Below are some tips from DBW to boaters on how they can safely and responsibly enjoy California’s waterways:

  • PLAN AHEAD: You should plan ahead and find out if your favorite boating spot has any boating operating restrictions. If your favorite spot is closed for boating and you opt to boat in a river or ocean, remember that operating vessels in these environments is very different than in lakes. Plan ahead, take a boating safety class or invite someone with experience to show you how to boat safely in rivers or the ocean.
  • EQUIP YOUR BOAT: Make sure your boat is ready for the boating season. All required equipment must be onboard. Most importantly, make sure you have Coast Guard-approved and properly fitted life jackets for everyone on board.
  • HAZARDS: Adjust your boating activities to the drought conditions. Water conditions are low enough in many places to make for hazardous boating. Areas that were easily boated a year ago may be dangerous this year. Keep a proper lookout for trees, snags, sandbars, etc.
  • BOAT RESPONSIBLY: Take a boating safety class or course to further minimize boating accidents. It is also critical for everyone in a boat to practice common sense measures, such as wearing life jackets at all times, avoiding the consumption of alcohol and operating boats at safe speeds. Last year, the top three causes (statewide) of boating accidents were operator inattention, excessive speed and operator inexperience.

In addition to DBW’s safety media campaign, the division will be carrying out several life jacket awareness campaigns during National Safe Boating Week (May 17-23) and throughout the summer. Programs encourage life jacket use through the distribution of free life jackets, loaner stations and a trade-in event (May 17). The division encourages water enthusiasts to partake in these programs. Remember, never get too comfortable around water when recreating, no matter how low the levels are.

For more boating safety tips and laws, or resources visit www.BoatCalifornia.com. Information on how to conserve water or about the “Save Our Water” public education program can be found at www.saveourH2O.org.

NOTE TO MEDIA: Story opportunities on boating and water safety can be scheduled with California State Parks.

Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.

About Parks
To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.

About DBW

DBW is a division within California State Parks. The division provides safe and convenient public access to California’s waterways and leadership in promoting safe, enjoyable and environmentally sound recreational boating.




04/21/2014

Earth Day: Recreational Boating Community Encouraged to Increase Clean Boating Practices

Earth Day: Recreational Boating Community Encouraged to Increase Clean Boating Practices


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval, PIO
(916) 651-5692

April 21, 2014


SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Earth Day serves as a reminder to California’s recreational boating community about the importance of keeping their rivers, lakes, and ocean clean not only on this day, but year-round. Accessing information on how to keep these natural resources clean is now easily accessible through mobile devices and computers.

California’s Boating Clean and Green Program offers several educational resources on clean boating, including new instructional videos, on their website www.BoatingCleanAndGreen.com. Tips offered on this website include how not to spread aquatic invasive species in waterways, information on pumpout sewage locations and fishing line recycling stations, how to properly dispose of recreational vessels, and so much more. The new videos include tips and tools to prevent oil and fuel discharges; how to report oil and chemical spills; dispose of used oil; environmental laws; information on other clean and safe boating practices, and information on how to properly use a sewage pumpout. All of these resources are complimentary to boaters and marine businesses. 

The Boating Clean and Green Program is an education and outreach program conducted through the California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways and California Coastal Commission. The program promotes environmentally-sound boating practices to marine businesses and boaters. The videos were developed in partnership with the San Francisco Estuary Partnership, Keep the Delta Clean Program, The Bay Foundation, and members from the marine industry and boating associations.

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Division of Boating and Waterways
To provide safe and convenient public access to California’s waterways and leadership in promoting safe, enjoyable and environmentally sound recreational boating.

Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.




02/18/2014

Become a Dockwalker, Help Keep California's Waterways Clean

Become a Dockwalker, Help Keep California's Waterways Clean


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

February 18, 2014



SACRAMENTO, Calif. – California’s Boating Clean and Green Program invites boaters to help keep the state’s marinas, waterways, and ocean clean and healthy by becoming a Dockwalker.

“California is fortunate to have volunteer Dockwalkers who carry out the important message of keeping the state’s waterways safe and clean with a high sense of pride,” stated DBW’s Deputy Director Sylvia O. Hunter. “We invite others to join in this effort so that future generations can enjoy clean waterways. The benefits of an informed public directly translate to safer and cleaner waters for California.”

The Dockwalker Program is free and provides volunteers with the necessary tools and resources to educate boaters on how to be safe and environmentally sound while boating in California. Upon completion of the training program, volunteers become Dockwalkers and conduct face-to-face interaction with boaters at marinas, boat launch ramps, boat shows and events. Hours spent training or educating the public qualify as community service.

Marinas and yacht clubs also benefit from the program. Their involvement provides marinas and yacht clubs with the educational materials and tools to operate a clean boating facility and minimize water quality impacts.

To become a volunteer, please contact the program coordinator, Vivian Matuk, at (415) 904-6905 or visit www.BoatingCleanandGreen.com for more details and to view the 2014 Dockwalker Training Schedule.

Partnerships with the Bay Foundation (DBW Clean Vessel Act Program), the Keep the Delta Clean Program, the US Coast Guard Auxiliary, the US Power Squadrons, Lake Berryessa Partnership, Save Our Shores and many more organizations have made this program successful. Since the year 2000, more than 700 volunteers have become Dockwalkers and more than 100,000 boater kits have been distributed throughout California.

About Boating Clean and Green Program
An education and outreach program conducted through the California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways and California Coastal Commission. The program promotes environmentally-sound boating practices to marine business and boaters.

About California Coastal Commission
Protects, conserves, restores and enhances environmental and human-based resources of the California coast and ocean for environmentally sustainable and prudent use by current and future generations.

About Division of Boating and Waterways
Provides safe and convenient public access to California’s waterways and leadership in promoting safe, enjoyable and environmentally sound recreational boating.

About California State Parks
Provides for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state's extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation.